George Soros’s Life as a Billionaire and Philanthropist

George Soros, one of the thirty richest men in the world (Inaccurately rated as the 27th on that list with a net worth of around $25 billion) has earned his position as an investor and maybe even one of the greatest investors in the world. Being born in Hungary, Budapest, he had to flee the country because of the threat of the Nazis and went to England to study and work. Soros was able to sustain himself by working as a waiter and eventually graduated in philosophy. He was then ready to move to New York where he would start putting into practice his knowledge of economics and investments. He had so much acquaintance with how the economy worked that he would later be renowned as the man who broke the Bank of England.

After moving to New York, he got his presence on Wall Street and established a fund of $12 million that would later be renamed the Quantum Fund. With his already high funding, he was able to create the Soros Fund Management where he stars as one of the most notable investors in the market. He has also been investing in politics since he attempted to defeat George W. Bush with his presence in 2004, an attempt that he defined as “a matter of life and death” when comparing Bush to the Nazis. The same scenario repeated itself in 2016 when he committed $25 million of his fortune to support the cause of Hilary Clinton. His fear for Donald Trump as the next president would lead him to commit even more money on Hilary as the Election Day was coming closer.

Read more about George at The New York Times.

Soros is not only known for his fortune, but he is also a major philanthropist of high importance to the globe. He has already funded organizations that promote freedom of speech, equality, and justice for years and has invested more than $12 million in non-profitable causes like the Global Witness. This focus on freedom and liberty as the principal reasons for his charities came from his past when George Soros lived the horrors of the Nazi aggression against his Jewish family. One of the most notable works of philanthropy he supported happened in 1979 when he decided to give scholarships to black South Americans that were feeling the censure of the Apartheid. His philanthropy work has not stayed in the United States only but has traveled around the world, and the man has since moved to promoting justice and freedom to supporting other types of causes, like the legalization of marijuana in medical treatment. He also backed the movement that wanted to combat the preconception against the marriage of the same sex.

Read this story at Politico.com about George Soros.

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